Can a Chin Strap Effectively Replace CPAP?

Perhaps you’ve seen the advertisements selling a chin strap to treat sleep apnea. A chin strap. To treat sleep apnea. Really? But does it work? Some people claim that it helps them. Others say it’s a scam. Which is it? Let’s take a no spin look at this, shall we?

The Chin Strap
Chin Strap
Women Wearing Chin Strap

Cpap remains the gold standard of therapy for sleep apnea. But unfortunately, many people can’t tolerate this form of treatment. The good news is, there are other forms of treatment available. One such device in the news recently is the chin strap. And while not new, it appears to have a ‘new’ function. It not only holds your mouth closed but claims it will keep your airway open as well.

But does it live up to its claim? Let’s take a no spin look into this. We’ll also see how it compares to other forms of treatment.

To begin with, there are several different styles of chin straps. But they all do 2 basic things: they hold your mouth closed, and support your jaw so it stays in place. With that, we’ll look at what holding your mouth closed does and doesn’t do. But first, let’s see why holding your mouth closed is actually healthier for you.

Mouth Breathing is bad for Your Health

When you breathe through your mouth, the air isn’t warmed and moisturized like it is with nasal breathing. This causes dry mouth, which encourages bacteria growth, leading to cavities. Nasal breathing not only warms and moisturizes the air, it also acts as a filter, reducing dust and allergens.

Also, when you breathe through your nose, Nitric Oxide is produced in small quantities. This gas actually makes you absorb more oxygen, which is even more important while you’re sleeping. This is because your breathing becomes slower and shallower in your sleep.

Keep in mind that many people see their Dentist more than their Doctor. Therefore it’s usually the Dentist that notices mouth breathing issues. Additionally, mouth breathing in children can actually cause abnormal facial and dental development.

However, holding your mouth closed by itself does not keep your airway open. But if you’re using cpap, and you can’t tolerate a full face mask, and you breathe with your mouth, a chin strap can be a good addition to your treatment.

Although, there are times when holding your mouth closed isn’t good.

When not to use a Chin Strap

Because a chin strap holds your mouth closed, you really shouldn’t use one if you have sinus congestion or anything else that makes it difficult to breathe just through your nose.

Also, a chin strap will only reduce snoring coming from your throat. There’s a flap of skin at the back of your throat called the soft palate. Air flowing across that can cause it to vibrate, resulting in a snore. A chin strap will have some effect in this case. However, it will have no effect on snoring originating from your sinuses.

Additionally, if you suspect that you have sleep apnea, or have been diagnosed with OSA, a chin strap might not be effective at all. Some symptoms to be aware of are:

  • Waking with a headache
  • Being REALLY tired all the time
  • Mood swings
  • Depression
  • High blood pressure
  • Snoring and/or pauses in breathing
  • Waking up choking

If you have any of these symptoms, you might have sleep apnea and should have a sleep study.

However, the chin strap also supports your jaw, keeping it from falling back against your throat. So you’d think that it would do some good,. right? But a study done on 26 adult patients with OSA, found that a chin strap alone was not effective in treating sleep apnea. Granted, this is a rather small study.

But what about oral appliances? Don’t they do the same thing as a chin strap? How do these 2 devices compare?

Let’s take a look.

Chin Strap vs Oral Appliance

Chin Strap Vs Oral ApplianceA chin strap holds your mouth closed, while oral appliances don’t to the same degree. And while both the chin strap and the oral appliance hold your jaw forward, oral appliances have been proven to do this more effectively.

So even though a chin strap is less expensive than an oral appliance, it’s also less effective. But please be aware, because while you can get cheap oral appliances online, they won’t work as well either. Why’s that? Because the most effective oral appliance is the one fitted and adjusted just for you. These types of oral appliances are adapted to you, preferably in a sleep lab, where the Technologist can fine-tune them to get you breathing well.

However, you can’t use an oral appliance if you have dentures or loose/missing teeth. So if that’s you, and you also can’t tolerate CPAP, talk with your Doctor. There are surgical procedures that may help.

Now let’s take a brief look at cost.

Cost Comparisons

CPAP can run anywhere from $1,500 to $3,500.

On the other hand, an Oral Appliance can range from $1,800 to$2,000. And oral appliances are favored over CPAP. Also, most insurance companies cover these devices. Of course, you can get less expensive devices online for Less than $50.00. But as we’ve seen, this really isn’t a good option.

Cost of Anti Snoring Chin Strap? Anywhere from $6.99 at Walmart, up to $59.99.

So then…

Is a Chin Strap right for me?

Remeber, there’s a difference between simple snoring, and snoring with sleep apnea. Talk with your Doctor about any concerns you have before buying anything.

And again, the cost is certainly a concern for most of us. Therefore there’s a tendency to take the cheapest route. So why not just buy a chin strap or oral appliance and be done with it. But is it that easy? If you haven’t even been diagnosed with sleep apnea, how do you know you’re giving yourself the right treatment?

Maybe all you do is snore.  But, where is your snoring originating from? Is it from the soft palate, that flap of skin at the back of your throat? Or is it coming from your sinus area? Or both? And what if your snoring is a sign of something worse, like sleep apnea?

And if you live alone, you have no one to tell you what you do in your sleep. Maybe you’ve woke yourself up snoring or snorting. If that’s the case, don’t take any chances with a simple chin strap or cheap oral appliance. That’s the time to have a talk with your Doctor.

Suspect sleep apnea especially if you have certain body characteristics that make you more likely to have OSA. The physical characteristics that you inherit make it either more or less likely that you’ll have this disorder. The 3 main physical traits are the shape of the bony structures of the skull and face, body fat distribution, and how the upper airway muscles function.

So then, CPAP machines and oral appliances are more expensive, but they also work the best. And while chin straps do serve a purpose, they work better in conjunction with CPAP.

Conclusion

We’ve taken a look at the chin strap, and also compared it with other devices for sleep apnea. We’ve discovered that the chin strap is limited in its function. And while there’s a tendency to ‘go the cheap route’, when it comes to your health, please don’t play with your life like that.

Till next time…Blessings.

Is a Home Sleep Test as Good as an in lab Sleep Test?

What is a Home Sleep Test, and is it as good as in lab sleep test?

Home Sleep Test

It’s exciting to see the advancements in sleep medicine.  Along with all the changes taking place in the insurance industry, Technology, and the economy in general. Many of these developments are changing how sleep studies are performed. For instance, a Home Sleep Test is becoming more common.

So, let’s take a rather brief look at a Home Sleep Test, and see how it compares with an in lab sleep study.

About Insurance

First of all, insurance is a major player in sleep medicine. And in order to keep premiums down, insurance companies push for the least expensive tests. The reason behind this is that the less the insurance company pays out, the lower your premiums will be; which makes sense. There’s also the economic pressure to keep costs down.

Now consider that one Technologist can do two, maybe three in lab sleep studies at a time. However, that same Technologist can handle more Home sleep tests at once. And a Home Sleeps test, or HST doesn’t cost as much. So you can see where this trend is going.

But, are HST’s as good as in lab sleep tests? Let’s first take a look at the type of sleep tests available. Then we’ll look at a typical Home Sleep Study. We’ll also compare costs and see who can have an HST. I’ll also explain why some people shouldn’t have an HST; in fact, can’t even qualify for one.

Types of Sleep Tests

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services or CMS defines 4 types of sleep studies, based on what’s being monitored. A type 1 study is an in lab sleep study,  attended by a Technologist. This has been the gold standard of sleep tests, as it’s the most thorough.

Types 2-4 are home studies. These studies are defined by the number of channels recorded. Type 2 studies record more channels than type 3 studies. While type 4 studies record the fewest channels. And while an in lab study can test for a whole range of sleep disorders, an HST only monitors breathing.

Another downside to an HST is that something can come unhooked during the night while you’re sleeping. And that could make the study incomplete.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at a typical Home Sleep Test.

A Typical Home Sleep Test

You go into the sleep center the evening of your study and pick up the equipment needed for the night. The Technologist will go over everything with you; showing you how to put things on, and should answer your questions.

Then, in the comfort of your own home, you hook yourself up and (hopefully) go to sleep. In the morning, you bring the equipment back to the sleep center, where they’ll download your data. If it’s determined that you need CPAP, you’ll be set up with what’s called an auto-PAP machine. This type of device is set to automatically change pressures through the night based on how you’re breathing.

You can keep the auto-pap. But you might also have the option to get a CPAP machine. In that case, you’ll bring the auto-pap in and they’ll download the data. Then they’ll  use that to determine your optimal pressure. And they’ll give you a CPAP machine set to your best therapy level.

Other Home Sleep Test Information

Cost of a Home Sleep Test vs an in lab study

An in lab study can run anywhere from $600, to $5,000; with an average being around $1,000. However, a Home Sleep Test runs anywhere from $150 to $500. And insurance covers both.

Who should not have an HSAT?

A Home Sleep Test just monitors breathing. Therefore, it only detects sleep apnea, but none of the other sleep disorders. That’s why a careful assessment of your medical history is important. For example, if you have any heart or lung conditions, you might need an in lab study.

Other reasons you might need an in lab study

If your Doctor suspects you might have some other sleep disorder, he/she could order an in lab study. And anyone 18 years and younger would need an in lab study as well.

So, While A Home Sleep Test is becoming more common, it’s not for everyone. And even with all the advancements in sleep medicine, there might always be a place for in-lab sleep studies.

Conclusion

We’ve taken a rather brief look at a Home sleep test. We’ve seen the advantages of an HST. And also discovered why a Home Sleep Test isn’t for everyone. We’ve also seen why this type of test might become more common in the future.

How about you? Have you had a Home Sleep Study?  Would you like to share your experience? Or do you have questions about HST’s vs in lab studies? Please leave a comment and let me know what you think.

Till next time…Blessings.

What Happens When we Sleep and Dream?

Why do we dream?

Dreaming permits each and every one of us to be quietly and safely insane every night of our lives”    Dr. William C. Dementdream

A lot of research has gone into the nature of sleep and dreams. In this article, I’ll talk about the results of some of that research. We’ll look at some of the benefits of good healthy sleep. And we’ll also address the question of why we dream.

During sleep, a number of things happen. For one, certain hormones are released that rejuvenate our bodies. Other changes take place that assist in cleansing toxins and help us process memory. There’s even a process that helps improve our mood.

To Dream or not to Dream

We mainly dream in REM sleep but can dream in other stages of sleep as well. However, dreams in REM sleep are usually more bizarre, emotional, and tend to last longer than non-REM dreams. Also, we become ‘paralyzed’ in REM sleep. This is so we don’t act out our dreams. Although, interestingly enough, we aren’t paralyzed while we dream in other stages. Additionally, women’s dreams are more focused on smell and taste; whereas men’s dreams are more sound and pain oriented.

And yes, blind people do dream. But, if they were either born blind or were blind before age 4-5, there aren’t any images in their dreams. However, those who became blind after that age do see images.

Also, we’re generally not aware that we’re dreaming when in fact, we are. However, there are times of lucid dreaming when we do become aware we’re dreaming. In lucid dreaming, we can actually manipulate our dream. In fact, some people can do this and get amazing results.

The Lucid Dream

For instance, I was talking to a guy awhile ago, and he was telling me about another guy who was able to manipulate his dreams. He was a skateboarder. He’d go into his dream and practice a skateboarding trick over and over. When he got up the next day, he’d go out and try that trick, and do it like he had actually been practicing it.

But is dream manipulation always a good thing? Or should I say, is there a reason we generally aren’t aware we’re dreaming and have no control over them? We know that dreaming is part of memory consolidation.  So then, should we just let the dream play out and do whatever it’s supposed to? Or can we gain something by manipulating it? Which makes me wonder, do we mess with, or alter memories in some way by manipulating our dream?

With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the benefits of sleep and dreams.

Dream and Mood Regulation

In 1960, William C. Dement, MD, Ph.D., did an interesting study on REM sleep deprivation. Test subjects were awakened right as they entered REM sleep, thus depriving them of dreams. The result?

‘Dr. Dement observed increased tension, anxiety and irritability among his subjects along with difficulty concentrating, an increase in appetite with consequent weight gain, lack of motor coordination, feelings of emptiness and depersonalization and hallucinatory tendencies.’ https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-news/your-dreams/page/0/1

In addition to this, there’s strong evidence that shows dreaming increases our mood. That’s why you actually do feel better the next day. Although, if your mood is really low, it might take more than one night to get you out of it. Interestingly, if you go to sleep in a fairly good mood to begin with, you generally don’t wake up feeling better yet. (wouldn’t that be nice!)

Also, nightmares decrease with age. And coping skill increase with age. So it seems that there’s even a connection between nightmares and the ability to cope with life situations.

Interestingly, people who suffer from Depression have more REM sleep and less slow wave sleep. It looks like their minds are spending extra time trying to boost their mood. The downside to this is that they get less slow wave sleep. And again, that’s the stage where hormones are released that rejuvenate and refresh our bodies.

Therefore, it does appear that dreaming plays a roll in regulating our emotions.

Sleep and Memory Consolidation

For most of us, we have a tendency to be forgetful. In fact, we tend to forget things quite rapidly within the first couple hours after learning a new thing. However, if we fall asleep immediately after learning, we’re able to remember more of it. So then, ‘sleeping on it’ is a good thing.

Furthermore, I once read a report that showed how memory is processed while we sleep. In this study, the same exam was given to two groups of people with similar I.Q.’s. The one group studied, slept, and then took the exam. The other group slept, then studied and took the exam. Interestingly, the group that studied then slept scored higher than the group that slept, then studied.

Not only do we process memory in our sleep, we are also capable of solving problems while we dream. Additionally, studies have shown that with problem-solving, more complex problems were solved better after sleep. With simple problems, there was no significant difference between the sleep and the no-sleep group. Many discoveries and inventions have come to people in a dream.

But something else quite interesting also happens while you snooze. Check it out.

A Cleansing Sleep

Did you know that sleep flushes out your brain? Brain scans on mice have shown something quite intriguing. When these mice fell asleep, the cells in their brains moved apart! This, of course, created more space between them. The result was that fluid between the cells was able to flow faster while asleep.

What happens is this. Toxic substances build up in the fluid surrounding the cells in your brain. Specifically, research has found that clumps of a protein called Beta Amyloid build up in your brain. Eventually, this substance blocks nerve signal transmission, which leads to Alzheimer’s. This chemical can build up while we’re awake but flushes out as we sleep. So a good nights sleep can also reduce your chances of getting this disorder as well.

It’s like your brain has a valve that opens while you’re asleep, and closes while you’re awake. Which leads to the question of ‘why doesn’t it just stay open all the time? One theory is that it simply takes too much energy flush the brain while it’s also processing the world around it. Or maybe similar to trying to run a program on your computer while you’re rebooting it.

Conclusion

In this article, we’ve seen some of the benefits of good quality sleep. How it not only helps us process memory, and even make new discoveries. But it also helps clean our brains out so that we can stay more healthy.

And although sleep and dream research has answered many questions, it also created many more. Clearly, more research needs to be done. However, the future sounds exciting!

Till next time…Blessings.

 

 

 

These Medications Will Disturb Your Sleep

In my last article, I talked about insomnia and some of the diseases that Medicationscan cause this debilitating disorder. This time, I’ll address some of the medications prescribed for various diseases that can also disrupt your sleep. I won’t be providing any alternative forms of treatment here as the focus is on medicines that cause sleep disruptions.

But first, let’s briefly talk about sleep itself.

What causes us to Sleep?

How does sleep ‘work’?  What causes you to fall asleep? And what wakes causes you up?

One way to look at it is that you gain a sleep debt while awake. When you’re awake, you accumulate a sleep debt. As this debt rises, the need to sleep becomes stronger. Eventually the need to sleep becomes stronger than the need to stay awake. At that point, you fall asleep.

Then as you sleep, you ‘pay off’ this sleep debt. As this debt gets paid off, the need to sleep naturally becomes weaker. Finally, it gets to the point where the need to sleep becomes less than the need to stay awake; and you wake up.

What’s the Reason for Sleep?

Sleep isn’t just a time to ‘stop and rest’. A lot of things happen while you snooze. As a matter of fact, different stages of sleep provide both physical and mental benefits. For instance, memories are processed in REM sleep. While slow wave sleep produces certain hormones that aid in growth and restoration of your body. Our bodies are created to self-heal. And part of that healing process involves quality sleep.

So then, ideal sleep is necessary for your health and well being. Therefore, poor quality sleep isn’t good. Thus, if you have a disease that’s disrupting your sleep, and you’re taking medications that further disturb that sleep, you’re kinda fighting against the healing process.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the more common medications and how they disrupt your sleep pattern.

Allergies

Many medications for allergies cause drowsiness; however, there are some that don’t. Benadryl (diphenhydramine ) is a common over the counter medication that does cause drowsiness.

Anxiety

In addition to causing drowsiness, some of the medications prescribed for anxiety- also impair performance, such as driving. However, there isn’t solid evidence these impairments continue with long term use. Some of the more common medications are Xanax (alprazolam ), Klonopin ( clonazapam ), and Valium (diazapam ).

Depression

If you struggle with depression, you also have sleep disturbances. You’re most likely fighting sleep when you should be awake, and yet finding it hard to stay asleep. Additionally, the very medications you are prescribed can cause further sleep disruptions.

Additionally, drugs like Nardil ( phenelzine ), and Marplan ( isocarboxazid) can greatly reduce REM sleep. Keep in mind that REM sleep is where memory is processed; kind of ‘brought together’.

Epilepsy

Drowsiness is more common with the older antiepileptic medications; less so with the newer ones. Also, cognitive impairment is more common with Luminal (phenobarbital ) than with other medications.

Heart Medications

Some medications for your heart can cause tiredness and fatigue. Other side-effects can include vivid dreams, nightmares, depression, and mental confusion. In some studies, medications such as Inderal (propranolol), Lopressor (metoprolol), showed an increase in wake time.

Additionally, most medications prescribed for your heart decrease REM sleep.

Mental Illness

People with Schizophrenia usually suffer from insomnia and other sleep disturbances. While most medications prescribed for this disorder cause drowsiness. Although, the older drugs, such as Haldol ( haloperidal ), Mellaril (thioridiazine ), and Thorazine ( chlorpromazine ), are more sedating than the newer drugs.

Parkinson’s

Daytime sleepiness, along with trouble sleeping at night are some of the characteristics of this disorder. some of this is due to abnormal movements during sleep cause numerous awakenings.

The main drug used to treat Parkinson’s is Sinemet( levodopa/carbidopa ). Ironically, some of the more common side effects of this drug include unusual and uncontrollable body movements.

Pain medications

Pain is kind of a double edged sword. On the one hand, it disturbs sleep. On the other hand, lack of sleep can increase pain. And while pain medication can cause drowsiness, many of the diseases that cause pain also cause sleep problems.

Narcotics such as Vicodin and Morphine can cause you to breathe more slowly, which can lead to  central sleep apnea which can cause your oxygen levels to drop; sometimes to dangerous levels.

Conclusion

Some disorders cause sleep disturbances. However, sometimes the very medications you take for a disorder further complicate things by causing even more disruptions to your sleep. And because good quality sleep is essential to your health, this can be a bit of a problem.

Therefore some medications themselves become a double edged sword. Helping the disorder, while hindering the sleep you so desperately need. Hopefully, further research will solve this dilemma.

Till next time…Blessings.

 

 

How to Beat Those Insomnia Blues

In this article, we’ll take a look at insomnia. What it is and what causes it; as well as what it can cause. We’ll also explore some treatment options.Insomnia

You’ve had a sleep study, but they say you don’t have sleep apnea. And yet, you’re still not sleeping. Laying in bed, the thought keeps rolling over in your head “What’s wrong with me?”

What is Insomnia?

Simply put, insomnia is defined as difficulty falling asleep and remaining asleep. It also includes some form of impairment during the day. And even though it’s the most common sleep disorder, insomnia is also the most underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Actually, according to some statistics, approximately 10% of the general population suffers from chronic insomnia, while 30% do so occasionally.

Actually, according to some statistics, approximately 10% of the general population suffers from chronic insomnia, while 30% do so occasionally. Additionally, there are different degrees of insomnia, from mild to moderate to severe. It can also briefly appear from time to time, or come and stay awhile.

But just what causes insomnia? Let’s take a look.

Risk factors

The typical person with insomnia is an elderly white female. There’s also some evidence that it might run in your family.

Some other factors include:

  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Depression
  • Medications
  • Menopause
  • Restless Legs Syndrome

Although the #1 cause of insomnia is long term Stress.

However, the most common disorders associated with insomnia are anxiety and depression.

Furthermore, if you have insomnia, you’re more likely to be involved in a fatal car accident . You’re also more likely to miss work. And when you are working, you’ll tend to make more mistakes.

In addition to this, insomnia itself is a risk factor for other diseases. Which in itself can make it difficult to properly diagnose.

Let’s look more closely at that.

Diagnosis

Insomnia can be difficult to properly diagnose. This is because it’s hard to determine if it’s a symptom of another disorder or a disorder all by itself. It’s important to find out what caused what so that proper treatment can be made.

For instance, depression can cause insomnia. However, insomnia can also cause depression. But which came first? If insomnia caused the depression, then treating the depression won’t entirely solve the problem.

Another reason for its difficulty involves something known as sleep state misperception. In other words, you can be in a very light stage of sleep, and feel as though you were lying awake the whole time.

Also, there are beliefs about sleep. In reality, some people need more sleep, some need less. The average is around 8 hours. So, if you believe you need 8 hours, but really only need 7, you could lay awake for an hour wondering why you can’t sleep.

Moreover, a diagnosis is made based mainly on what the patient describes, and includes reports of:

  • Attention, concentration and/or memory problems
  • Daytime Sleepiness
  • Difficulty with social interaction
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Poor school performance
  • Tension headaches

Your Doctor will make a diagnosis based on your sleep patterns. Also the use of some sleep questionnaires. Such as something called an  Epworth Sleepiness Scale

A sleep study could also be ordered if the cause of your insomnia is unclear. Additionally, your Doctor might order some blood work, if (s)he suspects some other medical condition that might be the underlying cause. Such as thyroid disease or iron deficiency anemia.

Once a diagnosis has been made, it’s time to look at some treatment options. We’ll start with changing the way you think and act.

Self Perpetuating Insomnia

Insomnia can be started by something that causes you concern. but continue long after the initial problem is solved. Here’s how.

Some life event causes some concern. In fact, you lay awake in bed worrying about this. Your concern is now making it difficult to fall asleep. After awhile, the initial cause of worry is taken care of. However, you’ve now been in a pattern of not being able to sleep so long that you now have concerns about your inability to sleep.

So now your worry about not being able to fall asleep is causing difficulty falling asleep. And so the cycle continues, long after the initial event that caused it. To further complicate this, now your lack of sleep can lead to depression.

Next, we’ll take a look at some treatment options.

Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Insomnia responds better to behavioral changes then to the use of medicine. However, a combination of treatments can be even more effective. Let’s start with something called Cognitive Behavior Therapy or CBT. This basically involves changing the way you think and behave. There are different forms of CBT, depending on your specific needs. These include:

  • Biofeedback
  • Improve your sleep space- This includes not having a tv, clock, or other electronic devices in your sleep area.
  • Mindfulness meditation
  • Relaxation training
  • Remaining passively awake-Simply try not to fall asleep It’s basically letting go of the worry that you can’t sleep. As mentioned earlier, it can sometimes be the worry of not being able to sleep that keeps you awake. Let go of that worry.
  • Sleep hygiene-Establishing good sleep habits
  • Sleep restriction-You builds up a ‘sleep debt’ while awake. When that ‘debt’ reaches a certain point, your brain tells you it’s time to go to sleep. However, any nap will ‘pay off’ some of that debt, leaving you more awake at bed time.

Also, keep in mind that body position is really important. For example, laying on your back is actually the best sleep position. This is because it properly aligns your spine and neck. As well as puts the least amount of strain on your body. Again, and I can’t stress this enough, there really should be no t.v. or other electronic devices in your bed room. And if noise is a factor, the use of a fan or other white noise machine can be helpful.

Next, we’ll take a look at some of the more common medications your Doctor might prescribe.

Medications

conventional

The 3 main medications are:

  • Allergies make it hard to breathe, which can be at least some of the cause of your insomnia. So if you have allergies, your Doctor might prescribe something like Diphenhydramine (Benadryl), or an over the counter med such as Doxylamine (Unisom).
  • Sedatives-Zolpidem (Ambien). Temazepam Lorazepam (Ativan)
  • Antidepressants-Trazadone. Mirtazapine (Remeron)

Alternative

There are some herbal supplements that have shown positive results. They include Melatonin, Valerian Root, and Chamomile.

And while medicine just relieves your symptoms, Cognitive Behavior Therapy will actually get at the cause of your sleeplessness. However, it will take time and effort on your part to get results.

As you can see, there are many good treatment options available. Talk with your Doctor, as you probably would benefit most from using a combination of treatments together.

Conclusion

We’ve looked at insomnia, and discovered some of the reasons it can be hard to properly diagnose. If you suffer from insomnia, I hope this article helps you understand it a little better. Also, if you know anyone suffering from this debilitating disorder, please share this article with them.

Till next time…Blessings.

 

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